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AIHW - Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2014-15, Oct 2016
AIHW - Young people in child protection and under youth justice supervision 2014-15, Oct 2016

In 2014–15, around 107,100 children and young people aged 0–17 had a notification of abuse or neglect investigated by a department responsible for child protection (AIHW 2016a) and almost 10,000 young people aged 10–17 were supervised by a department responsible for youth justice, in the community or in youth detention centres (AIHW 2016c). Some young people are involved in both the child protection system and youth justice supervision (AIHW 2016b).

Keeping Women Out of Prison Position Statement, Sept 2016
Keeping Women Out of Prison Position Statement, Sept 2016
The things which must be done - Aboriginal incarceration: the urgent need for Aboriginal community solutions, August 2016
The things which must be done - Aboriginal incarceration: the urgent need for Aboriginal community solutions, August 2016

The Hon Bob Debus AM explores how lessons from the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and beyond have been neglected or ignored. How our fixation on 'tough on crime' rhetoric contributes to skyrocketing incarceration rates, seeing funding diverted from rehabilitation and diversionary programs and instead into funding prison beds. How a comprehensive response to the issues of incarceration remains entwined with the foundational infrastructure of community support, land rights and self-determination.

NSW BOCSAR Crime and Justice Bulletin - Does a prison sentence affect future domestic violence reoffending? May 2016
NSW BOCSAR Crime and Justice Bulletin - Does a prison sentence affect future domestic violence reoffending? May 2016

Short prison sentences (up to 12 months) are no more effective in deterring DV-related reoffending than suspended sentences.

AIHW - Youth Justice in Australia 2014-15
AIHW - Youth Justice in Australia 2014-15

This bulletin examines the numbers and rates of young people who were under youth justice supervision in Australia during 2014-15 because of their involvement or alleged involvement in crime. It explores key aspects of their supervision, both in the community and in detention, as well as recent trends.

NT Aboriginal Interpreter Service - You Understand, Don't You? Video
NT Aboriginal Interpreter Service - You Understand, Don't You? Video

The Aboriginal Interpreter Service (AIS) facilitates effective cross cultural communication between service providers and Aboriginal people who do not speak English as a first language.  You Understand, Don't You - is a video about a reverse role play performed at the Language and the Law Conference in the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory - Darwin.

NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics & Research - Why is the NSW prison population still growing, January 2016
NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics & Research - Why is the NSW prison population still growing, January 2016
Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime Facts & Figures 2014
Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime Facts & Figures 2014
NSW Corrective Services Factsheets
NSW Corrective Services Factsheets

CSNSW Fact Sheet series covering prisons, visiting an inmate, parole, community based orders, programs and industries.

NSW Audit Office - Performance frameworks in custodial centre operations, March 2016
NSW Audit Office - Performance frameworks in custodial centre operations, March 2016

The effectiveness of Corrective Services NSW’s performance framework is limited because organisational key performance indicators (KPIs) do not cascade to public correctional centres, according to a report released today by the Acting New South Wales Auditor-General, Tony Whitfield.  “As a result, individual public correctional centres could not be assessed on how well they are contributing to overall Corrective Service objectives, and it is difficult to vary performance expectations in response to changing operating environments,” said Mr Whitfield. “Its commissioning and contestability project is designed to address these issues,” he added.

WIPAN Self Help Guide for Women Prisoners in NSW, 2011
WIPAN Self Help Guide for Women Prisoners in NSW, 2011

This Self-Help Guide has been produced to give women the tools to help themselves whilst in custody.

Corrective Services NSW and Community Restorative Centre, Families Handbook, 2009
Corrective Services NSW and Community Restorative Centre, Families Handbook, 2009

This book is a guide for families and friends of people imprisoned in correctional centres in NSW. When the book talks about ‘families’we mean all the people who might be important to someone in a correctional centre, which includes people who aren’t directly related. You may need additional information to address your particular situation. The book includes phone numbers of services that may be able to help you. This book may also give general information to assist families and friends of prisoners in other states in Australia. As each state has its own prison policies and procedures, check page 5 for support organisations for prisoners and their families in other states.

NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics & Research - Custody Statistics Quarterly Updates
NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics & Research - Custody Statistics Quarterly Updates

BOCSAR produces a quarterly report series examining trends in the number of adults and juveniles in prison in NSW. This report presents 24 months of reception, discharge and custody population data and comparisons between the current and previous quarter for age, gender, indigenous status, most serious offence and the average length of stay.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, The Health of Australian Prisoners 2015
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, The Health of Australian Prisoners 2015

The health of Australia’s prisoners 2015 is the 4th report produced by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare on the health and wellbeing of prisoners. The report explores the conditions and diseases experienced by prisoners; compares, where possible, the health of prisoners to the general Australian community and provides valuable insight into the use of prison health services. New to the 2015 report are data on the disabilities or long-term health conditions of prisoners entering the prison system (prison entrants), self-assessed mental and physical health status of prisoners and data on smoke-free prisons.

Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse, Australian Indigenous Women's Offending Patterns, June 2015
Indigenous Justice Clearinghouse, Australian Indigenous Women's Offending Patterns, June 2015

Indigenous Australian women form a very small percentage (2.2%) of Australian women but are overrepresented across the eight Australian criminal justice systems, comprising for example 34 percent of the Australian women’s prisoner population. In this research brief the offending patterns of Indigenous women in Australia are examined. 

Australian Review of Public Affairs, Have Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Legal Services Failed? A response to Weatherburn, Feb 2016
Australian Review of Public Affairs, Have Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Legal Services Failed? A response to Weatherburn, Feb 2016

In this article, we consider Don Weatherburn’s claim that Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (ATSILS) have a limited role in reducing Indigenous incarceration. We argue that Weatherburn understates the role of ATSILS. We make our argument in three parts: first, we assess the Weatherburn thesis as it relates to ATSILS. Second, we examine the weaknesses of Weatherburn’s methodology, which overlooks the complexity of Indigenous over-representation in Australian prisons. Third, we explore five counterfactual scenarios of a world without ATSILS, showing the major role ATSILS have regarding the myriad of cross-cultural and socioeconomic issues Indigenous people contend with when coming in contact with the justice system. We argue that ATSILS play an important role in addressing Indigenous over-representation in Australian prisons.

NSW Dept of Justice, Corrections Research Evaluation & Statistics (CRES) Research Publications
NSW Dept of Justice, Corrections Research Evaluation & Statistics (CRES) Research Publications

Corrections Research, Evaluation and Statistics (CRES) collects, analyses, interprets and disseminates information to assist Corrective Services NSW (CSNSW) planning, policy formulation and operational management. It also provides an information, analysis and advice service to the CSNSW Commissioner, the Minister for Police and Justice and responds to requests from outside CSNSW.

Washington Post - Denmark Doesn't Treat It's Prisoners Like Prisoners: And It is Good for Everyone, 2016
Washington Post - Denmark Doesn't Treat It's Prisoners Like Prisoners: And It is Good for Everyone, 2016
Network of Alcohol and Drug Agencies (NADA), Complex Needs Capable - resource for working with clients with complex needs, 2013
Network of Alcohol and Drug Agencies (NADA), Complex Needs Capable - resource for working with clients with complex needs, 2013

This resource was prepared to assist people working with clients presenting with drug and alcohol issues or co-existing drug and alcohol and mental health issues who have cognitive impairment (including intellectual disability, acquired brain injury and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder) and/or involvement with the criminal justice system.

Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault, Addressing women's victimisation histories in custodial settings, 2012
Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault, Addressing women's victimisation histories in custodial settings, 2012

In the last 20 years the numbers of women entering Australian prisons have risen dramatically. Many of these women have a history of sexual assault traumatisation from child sexual abuse as well as physical and sexual abuse they have encountered as adults. The prison system can often exacerbate trauma for female criminal offenders with a trauma history. This paper explores the prison as a possible site of re-traumatisation. The reasoning behind this is that prisons are built on an ethos of power, surveillance and control, yet trauma sufferers require safety in order to begin healing. A trauma-informed approach may offer an alternative to delivering a less traumatic prison environment and experience for female criminal offenders with a history of sexual abuse and assault.

Australian Institute of Criminology, Mental disorder prevalence at the gateway to the criminal justice  system, 2012
Australian Institute of Criminology, Mental disorder prevalence at the gateway to the criminal justice system, 2012

Many criminal justice practitioners have observed that offenders experience poor mental health. While international studies have found mental health to be poorer among prisoners than in the general population, less information is available either about offenders who are not imprisoned or alleged offenders detained by police. The mental health of offenders is of key policy interest from both health service and crime prevention perspectives.

Law and Justice Foundation of NSW, Taking Justice into Custody: Legal Needs of Prisoners, 2008
Law and Justice Foundation of NSW, Taking Justice into Custody: Legal Needs of Prisoners, 2008

All prisoners have criminal law issues. Civil and family law issues also emerge when people are imprisoned and removed from their daily lives. They add to legal problems which occurred before custody, and those particular to the prison environment (e.g. prison disciplinary matters and parole). Taking justice into custody: the legal needs of prisoners reports on in-depth qualitative research into the legal needs of prisoners and their capacity to access the law and legal help. This research includes interviews with prisoners, ex-prisoners, prison staff, lawyers and others, and a review of available literature and statistics. It also identifies opportunities for prisoners to obtain legal assistance and to participate in legal processes.